Submissions

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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  • The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF document file format.
  • Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  • The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

Author Guidelines

General guidelines

  • Currently, we are only accepting submissions written in English.
  • For all pieces, non-discriminatory language is mandatory.
  • Sexist or racist terms must not be used.
  • Articles submitted may not exceed 7,000 words and authors should include a bibliography at the end.
  • All authors must also please include their full names and affiliation (department and university). Please note that this will be displayed on the public article.

Submission’s Process:

  • Abstracts must please be submitted through the portal for it to go through the review process.
  • Once it has been reviewed, it will be accepted, refused or sent back to you for adjustments.
  • Articles must please be submitted through the portal for it to go through the review process.
  • Once it has been reviewed, it will be sent back to you for adjustments before being edited and published.

 

Responding to reviewers’ comments

If you have received a ‘revise and resubmit’ decision, please address the comments the peer reviewers have made. Please assume that each reviewer intended their comments to be helpful. You might feel that a reviewer has suggested or critiqued something based on a misunderstanding of your interpretation or the literature. In this case (without being too defensive) you have the right to explain carefully why you disagree with the critique or suggestion. In some instances, the critique or suggestion is based on how you expressed a point, rather than on the point itself. In such a case, you should consider simply making your point/s clearer to readers.

 

Responding to reviewers’ comments

 If you have received a ‘revise and resubmit’ decision, please address the comments the peer reviewers have made. Please assume that each reviewer intended their comments to be helpful. You might feel that a reviewer has suggested or critiqued something based on a misunderstanding of your interpretation or the literature. In this case (without being too defensive) you have the right to explain carefully why you disagree with the critique or suggestion. In some instances, the critique or suggestion is based on how you expressed a point, rather than on the point itself. In such a case, you should consider simply making your point/s clearer to readers.

 

Specific Style Guidelines:

Here are guidelines on how to cite publications as well other spelling and punctuation rules and conventions that you should please apply to your article. Please pay particular attention to the referencing guidelines.

 

General spelling and punctuation rules

  • Headings: Use sentence case and mark them in bold.
  • Font size: Use Arial 12 font, justified text with 1.5-line spacing option.
  • Quotes: If three lines or more (more than 40 words) please indent and italicise the quote.

 

  • NOTE: citations at end of the article are not italicised. (Also, citation to come after closing full stop of quote.)

 

Referencing

The ESI Journal uses the Harvard-style author–date referencing system, which has two parts:

  • In-text citations: (Author(s) surname(s) Year) / (Author(s) surname(s) Year: page number of direct quote)

Example: (Wilson 2019)

  • An alphabetised reference list containing the full publication details of all works cited in the
  • Please only include page numbers with a direct quote.

 

Examples for bibliography purposes:

 

PUBLISHED BOOK

Biko, S. 1978/2004. I write what I like. Johannesburg: Picador Africa. PUBLISHED BOOK - TRANSLATION

Freire, P. 1970/2003. Pedagogy of the oppressed, trans. Myra Bergman Ramos. New York: Continuum.

 

CHAPTER IN A BOOK

Santos, B.S. 2016. The university at a crossroads. In R. Grosfoguel, R. Hernández & E. Rosen Velásquez (eds), Decolonizing the westernized university: Interventions in philosophy of education from within and without (pp. 3–14). Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

 

WORKING PAPER/OCCASIONAL PAPER

Darity Jr, W. 2013. Confronting those affirmative action grumbles. Political Economy Research Institute Working Paper Series No. 309. Amherst, MA: Political Economy Research Institute.

 

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lebakeng, J.T., Phalane, M.M. & Nase, D. 2006. Epistemicide, institutional cultures and the imperative for the Africanisation of universities in South Africa. Alternation, 13(1): 70–87.

Nyoka, B. 2013. Negation and affirmation: A critique of sociology in South Africa. African Sociological Review, 17(1): 2–24.

Eybers, O. 2019. A social realist ontology for developing Afrocentric curricula in Africa. Journal of Decolonising Disciplines, 1(1): 47–63. DOI 10.35293/2664-3405/2019/v1n1a4

 

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE (ONLINE)

Makhanya, M. 2018, 1 July. Obsessed with whiteness. City Press. https://www.news24.com/Columnists/Mondli-Makhanya/obsessed-with-whiteness-20180629

 

WEBSITE ARTICLE

Mgqwashu, E. 2016, 16 March. Education can’t be for ‘the public good’ if universities ignore rural life. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/education-cant-be-for-the-public-good-if universities-ignore-rural-life-56214

 

CONFERENCE PAPER

May, J. 2003. Talking to the Finance Minister about poverty: Pro-poor policy and the political economy of information. Paper presented at the International Conference on Staying Poor: Chronic Poverty and Development Policy, IDPM, University of Manchester, 7–9 April 2003.

 

POLICY DOCUMENTS

UNCED (United Nations Conference on Environment and Development). 1992. Agenda 21 (Chapter 36). United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, Rio de Janeiro.

 

UNPUBLISHED THESES

Makhathini, B. 2015. ‘Trampoline trajectories’: A dialectical analysis of the correlation between the teaching of reading and the improvement of learner-academic performance in a rural South African primary school. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.

Mataka, T.W. 2017. Language and literacy development for a Grade 10 English first additional language classroom: A Reading to Learn case study. Unpublished MA thesis, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa.

 

UNPUBLISHED REPORTS

Gysae-Edkins, M. (Ed.). 1994. Report on the Environmental Education Workshop. Lesotho Association of Non-formal Education, Morjia.

 

PERSONAL COMMUNICATION

Moosa, V.M. 2003. Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Ministry of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Pretoria, 16 June 2003.

 

EMAIL

Nhamo, G. 2003. Request for official position and update on the Plastic Bags Regulation implementation. Email, 1 October 2003.

 

WEBSITE

DEAT (Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism). 2003. Inspection of readiness of retailers on the eve of Plastic Bag Regulations effect. Available at http://www.environment. gov.za [accessed 8 May 2003].

 

ORGANISATION AS AUTHOR

HSRC-EPC (Human Sciences Research Council-Education Policy Centre). 2005. Emerging voices: A report on education in South African rural communities. Commissioned by the Nelson Mandela Foundation. Cape Town: HSRC Press.

 

MULTIPLE AUTHORS

Lebakeng, J.T., Phalane, M.M. & Nase, D. 2006. Epistemicide, institutional cultures and the imperative for the Africanisation of universities in South Africa. Alternation, 13(1): 70–87.

 

MORE THAN ONE CITATION FROM THE SAME YEAR

Angu, P.E. 2018a. Disrupting western epistemic hegemony in South African universities: Curriculum decolonisation, social justice, and agency in post-apartheid South Africa. The International Journal of Learner Diversity and Identities, 25(1): 9–22.

Angu, P.E. 2018b. Understanding voices from the margins: Social injustice and agency in first-year students’ literacy narratives. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 1–11. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0309877X.2018.1458977?scroll=top&needAccess=tr ue

 

PARTICULAR SURNAMES

Van Wyk, B. & Higgs, P. 2012. The curriculum in African context. Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems, 10(2): 171–181.

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